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Proposed legislation to ban/limit tanning bed use by minors

In Jan and Feb several states proposed new legislation to restrict tanning salon use by minors. 

 

Colorado lawmakers proposed a bill banning minors from using tanning salons.  However, when it was realized that there were too few votes for the bill to pass, Senator Bob Hagedorn, D-Aurora amended the bill making it less restrictive.  It now requires parents to come to the tanning salon to sign a consent form, or have the form notarized.

 

South Dakotas Senate Bill 208, requiring parents to give consent for minors under the age of 18 to use tanning salons, did not pass.  However, legislators did agree to reconsider an amended version.

 

In Virginia, a bill restricting the use of tanning salons by minors age 15 and younger passed the Senate and was approved by the House Commerce and Labor Committee.  SB1231 requires minors age 15 and younger to be accompanied by a parent or guardian, or to have written parental consent, in order to use a tanning salon.  The bill is in the House of Representatives awaiting further action.

 

Maryland legislators proposed a bill banning children under 16 from using tanning salons and requiring parental permission for teenagers ages 16-17.  In addition, the bill would establish a public school curriculum to educate minors about the cancer risks from tanning. 

 

North Dakotas House of Representatives passed bill 1154 and it now moves to the senate where it is expected to pass.  Bill 1154 requires parental consent for minors under 18 to use tanning beds.

 

Utahs House of Representatives passed SB52 and it is now awaiting the Governors approval.  SB52 requires parents to update their consent form in person at the tanning salon every 12 months.

 

Colorado, South Dakota, Virginia, Massachusetts, North Dakota, and Utah are among a growing list of states with proposed or existing legislation to ban or restrict tanning bed use by minors.

 

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Glass does not block UVA

The UC Berkley Wellness Letter reported that while clear glass does block UVB rays - which cause sunburning and tanning, it does not block UVA which ages skin.  Both types of UV rays can cause skin cancer, so it is important to protect yourself from both UVA and UVB.  Windows can be treated to block 100% of all UV rays, or the same precautions that we take when outside can be taken when by a window indoors or in a car for extended periods of time.

 

Article Published: Protect yourself from sun damage in your car, home or office.  UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. August 2006.

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UV Index delivered to cell phones

The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed a service that uses satellites to deliver the UV index to cell phones. The Happy Sun Mobile (HSM) service also advises users about how to protect themselves and sends details about sea surface temperature and sea water transparency. HappySun calculates the UV Index throughout the day by using ESA satellite data on radiation, ozone and cloud coverage. "HappySun is a tool for the primary prevention of skin cancer," Franco Marsili, Director of the Dermatology Clinic at the Versilia Hospital in Italy, said. "The aim is to educate people about the intelligent 'use' of the sun."  Users are able to personalize the service by completing an online questionnaire about skin sensitivity to UV. Once a user specifies the place and time of sun exposure, HappySun calculates the personal safe exposure time and suggests the adequate SPF. HappySun is currently available only in Italy, but hopefully will make its way to the United States. 

Article Published: Satellites Help Ensure Safe Sunning.  Medical News Today. October 14, 2006.  

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